I'm Stephanie Koltun.
I hate bios but I like making interactive projects, such as
—daily maps of New York City,
—unfamiliar controllers to play familiar games,
—explorable visualizations of large datasets,
—web films about seemingly boring subjects, and
—inconvenient direction routing services.

This website is an index of these works in-progress, collaborations and writing. I code, design and build physical things.

— Currently Working On

Known and Strange Places—a daily practice of map making and investigating maps as interactive bodies of knowledge

Follow on Instagram

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Github repository

How Thrilling—extending many bodies into many spaces

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Take Me To—explore the physical locations of networks

— On The Shelves

Making 'Making Legible' Legible—finding relationships within a corpus written across two years with idiosyncratic versioning

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Directagram—get directions, but routed through the most popular Instagram locations (sorta) along the way

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The Train and The Station—a series of documentary shorts about the subway as a place and space, as a character

Live site

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Controllers for Pong—new forms of interacting with a familiar game

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Github repository

Acquiring Design—an interface for exploring relationships within the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum’s collection.

Live site

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Birds in C—conduct an orchestra of birds through a re-interpretion of Terry Riley’s “In C”

Live site

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— Working with Others

ML5.js—working group member for a high level javascript library for machine learning

with NYU ITP

Live site

Github repository

Thermal Comfort Tool—designed and developed an online tool for evaluting thermal comfort in winter months

with Payette

Live site

Github repository

ActionIQ—developed a design system and interaction language for a growing startup

with ActionIQ

Adjacent—editor and writer for the NYU ITP online journal for emerging media and interactive technology

with NYU ITP

Live site

Top Down—a walkable topography that challenges how we experience Toronto’s urban form

with Taylor Davey, Samantha Eby and Katherine Kovalcik

— Writing

Technology's Imagined Universal Body—reconsidering McLuhan's assertion of how technology extends the body

The Everyday Icon—how is the monumentality of Casa da Musica is transgressed as everyday activity is projected onto and into the blank container?